Fit For An Autopsy

Fit For An Autopsy

Tombs, Moon Tooth, It's Always Sunny in Tijuana

Wed Jul 05 2017

7:00 pm

$12.00 - $15.00

This event is all ages

Fit For An Autopsy
It seems there’s a new catastrophe hitting the headlines everyday, from corrupt politicians and crooked business people, to criminal mischief and the oppressive renegades within the ranks of those entrusted to protect the people from crime; extreme divides between rich and poor, ideological battles, shrinking resources, the constant threat of war, terror, famine, disease. The problems of the world are every bit as grim, perhaps more so, than during the Cold War, when protest, counterculture, and music from punk to thrash helped give voice to the voiceless.

The crushing music of Fit For An Autopsy is for any fan of extreme metal, as it’s devoid of preachy politics or grandstanding soapboxing, but its sound and fury is absolutely unflinching in purpose. The band expertly blends excessive-force fueled death metal with atmospheric groove and impassioned personal diatribes, reflecting back the dark state of current events. Their fourth album, The Great Collapse, doesn’t waste time with fantasy bullshit or cliché gore horror. Fit For An Autopsy are metal guys, to be certain, but they grew up in the hardcore scene. They embrace the responsibility to put as much devoted purpose into their lyrics and message as they do into their dense, heady, songs, forging a magnificently powerful new post-deathcore.

“When I write a song, I’m trying to feel emotionally connected to it. I really don’t like saying things that don’t matter over music that I want to matter,” says Will Putney, guitarist, principal songwriter and cofounder. “We’ve always addressed serious topics going back to our first album. We aren’t a politically charged band up on a podium yelling at people – anybody can relate to the aggression, anger, frustration, and sadness often communicated in our music. But we absolutely raise important questions in the lyrics. Those themes are there to discover.”

Putney’s fellow guitarist/cofounder, Patrick Sheridan, strongly agrees. He emphasizes that while the music of Fit For An Autopsy may evolve it will always be aggressive and will always have purpose. “We think it's important to carry that torch. Somebody's got to say something about the shit that's going on. If you're not using your music, which is a great platform, for something meaningful that you care about on some level, then you're kind of wasting it.”

The six-men of the New Jersey based group - which includes vocalist Joe Badolato, bassist Peter Spinazola, third guitarist Tim Howley, and drummer Josean Orta - put maximum intentionality into everything they do. They are constantly challenging themselves as musicians, adding to the band’s overall creative arsenal, connecting with audiences around the world, and supporting one another in the band as individual people.

Fit For An Autopsy first summoned one of the most crushing takes on the then-burgeoning deathcore genre with their 2008 demo and the following year’s self-released Hell on Earth EP, which led to a deal with The Red Chord vocalist Guy Kozowyk’s Black Market Activities label.

The Process of Human Extermination earned them a place among the genre’s giants, cementing them as energizing leaders rather than stale followers. As MetalSucks observed: “The band’s brutal, glowering take on [deathcore] reminded [us] of the squandered potential of the genre. Hardcore grooves and swagger, when incorporated correctly, blend quite well with death metal.” Fit For An Autopsy’s determined drive, work ethic, and devilishly unmistakable talent next elicited the attention of Good Fight/eOne, the group’s home since their sophomore album.

On Hellbound, Fit For An Autopsy expanded their commanding approach to death metal with hints of metalcore by absorbing increasingly diverse elements, from the rhythmic experimentalism of Gojira to the aggressive post-Noisecore of Converge, with a dose of the New Wave Of Swedish Death Metal, and a touch of groove unique to the New Jersey six-piece.

The group toured with The Acacia Strain and Within The Ruins on the No Way Out Tour, followed by Hate Across America with Thy Art Is Murder. In 2014, they hit the road with Chimaira, Iwrestledabearonce, and Oceano; with Whitechapel, DevilDriver, Carnifex, and Revocation; with Crowbar; and with Suicide Silence and Thy Art Is Murder. Toward the end of the excitingly productive Hellbound cycle, original frontman Nate Johnson split from the band.

The band’s third album served as the recorded introduction of powerhouse vocalist Badolato, whose impressive range (from guttural growls to pitch screaming and beyond) helped destroy all remaining self-imposed boundaries. It’s something the group’s instrumental members had yearned to do as even as they prepared the material prior to enlisting their new singer.

Absolute Hope Absolute Hell cracked the Top 20 on the Hard Rock Albums chart and hit #3 on Billboard’s Heatseekers chart. As Putney often noted in interviews, the record stood defiantly apart from those that offered little more than thirty minutes of blast beats and breakdowns.

Sure, that kind of nonstop pummeling has its place, but Fit For An Autopsy concentrated their focus less on crazy tempo changes and more on atmosphere and vibe, keeping one foot in the crushingly heavy while drawing more deeply from traditional metal influences, post-rock, and esoteric nuance. In 2015, the same year as Metal Injection and other tastemakers hailed the group’s progression, Fit For An Autopsy joined the Stronger Than Faith Tour with Suicide Silence, Emmure, and Within The Ruins, followed by a co-headlining tour with Aborted, a trek with Old Wounds, and the Tune Low Die Slow Tour with Acacia Strain and Counterparts.

“Being out there touring, I can say that our fans have been very accepting of each change and progression,” Sheridan notes proudly. “I’m very grateful, as oftentimes bands are scrutinized heavily as they evolve. We definitely took a step in a direction that people were stoked about.”

Putney points to Absolute Hope Absolute Hell as a definitive moment in the band’s career when they truly came into their own. “I like the earlier records a lot but we were definitely lumped in with a lot of similar-sounding bands at the time. I was happy that we were able carve our own path a little bit more on the last album, which we carried into this new album.”

Between Absolute Hope Absolute Hell and The Great Collapse, the group’s members were able to broaden their creative horizons even further with what became known as The Depression Sessions, a uniquely collaborative project that combined Fit For An Autopsy with their friends in Thy Art Is Murder and The Acacia Strain. Jettisoning the cutthroat competitiveness that often gets between bands, the trio of extreme metal acts joined forces for experimental sessions more akin in spirit to the jazz greats and hip-hop artists, but within the context of heavy music.
All of that collaboration and experimentation, to say nothing of Putney’s accomplishments as an in-demand genre producer whose credits include work with both of the bands who joined them in The Depression Sessions, among others, led to an all new focus on The Great Collapse.
“Iron Moon” is an aggressive shot across the bow of the status quo, railing against the mundane servitude of the 9-to-5 grind, yearning for a life of meaning and purpose. It’s as anti-establishment in tone as the album is in sound. Fit For An Autopsy break with genre convention even as they reshape and redefine their chosen sonic landscape. “Heads Will Hang” confronts the worldwide refugee problem, demanding empathy, placing the listener in the shoes of someone displaced from their home, hungry to escape into a safer life. “When the Bulbs Burn Out” expresses the group’s deep concerns or conservationism sustainability. “Black Mammoth” was inspired by the conscientious activism of the Dakota Access Pipeline protestors. Other tracks are more abstract lyrically, but no song on The Great Collapse is without intensity.
The album’s underlying death metal foundation serves as strong support for its more adventurous forays into chaotic hardcore, bits of deathcore, and a meditative, almost droning rumination not unlike the best of shoegaze and desert rock, like a hazy collision between Queens Of The Stone Age and Russian Circles. The omnipresence of rock titans Tool weaves in and out in powerful doses, with The Great Collapse inviting ever more favorable comparisons to Gojira, a band whose evolutionary trajectory is not dissimilar from Fit For An Autopsy’s path.
“It’s definitely easier to make a living as a band by growing your fanbase within one specific style,” notes Putney. “But it's more rewarding to go this route. There’s a certain struggle you face when you’re constantly evolving, obstacles you have to face, but we’re happy to do it.”
Sheridan concurs. “I don't want to sound like any one band or do any one thing. I always want to figure out ways to incorporate new elements that inspire us into what we already do.
“We made a promise when we released our first record, which is that we will never do what somebody else wants us to do as a band. We will always carve our own way.”
Tombs
Tombs front-man Mike Hill is not a man interested in appeasing his existing audience or modifying the music he makes in the hope of luring in a broader one. Letting the songs come as and when inspiration hits him is integral to Hill's process, and this accounts in part for The Grand Annihilation's diversity. The blasting, scathing yet melodic black metal savagery of opener "Black Sun Horizon" and "Way Of The Storm" are very much built to destroy, while wielding a poignancy that is undeniable - both of which stand in strong contrast to the uncomfortable post-punk squall of "Underneath" that showcases Hill's Nick Cave/Ian Curtis-esque singing voice, while the likes of the throbbing "Saturnalian" and unnerving tribal thunder of "Walk With Me In Nightmares" stand in categories all of their own. While every track on The Grand Annihilation stands separate from those around it, it is still a cohesive collection, and at no point do the stylistic twists and turns undermine its coherence.

"If you've been following Tombs, you probably know to expect the unexpected, and I always strive to present a full range of emotion on everything with the band's name on it," Hill explains. "That said, this is a very dark and introspective record that digs deep into the common ideas of mortality, infinity and cosmic mysteries. The lyrics on the new record are a celebration of freedom through embracing the dark side. Once you realize that you follow the dark path - the path of the individual - there is a certain feeling of liberation that accompanies it."
Moon Tooth
February 5th, 2016 marked the release of Chromaparagon, the debut full-length album by Long Island, New York band Moon Tooth.

Stream or purchase the album, here:
http://moontoothny.bandcamp.com/

A fireworks display of melody and rhythm, Chromaparagon is more than that too – its progressive, aggressive sound is brimming with soul, riddled with hairpin turns, and delivered with the grace and swing of real virtuosos. Over the course of twelve songs, Moon Tooth mashes together rock, metal, and blues, into a fusion that bursts with color. There are few limits here. Moon Tooth possesses the imagination and skill to swerve into whatever musical direction it wants. But this band wanders without getting lost; it channels its wild dreaming and black-belt chops into an album that drives forward with purpose.

Frontman John Carbone carries forth the tradition of singers with the range and the courage to go for it. Like Jeff Buckley, Into Another's Richie Birkenhead or Shudder to Think's Craig Wedren, Carbone belts it out with a soaring voice that can command quiet subtlety as well as arena-rocking operatics. In poetic, modern-mythic phrases, his lyrics address themes of, in his own words, "trials, perseverance, victory... answering the call of adventure, following what you know to be your true purpose even in the face of danger, uncertainty and fear."

"I made love to my ordeals / By light of holy fire / A lion rearing under ash / All the beasts of un-days loomed / And I saw Mars stand," Carbone sings on the song "Igneous."

Guitarist Nick Lee (also the newest member of veteran heavy metal act Riot, now known as Riot V) extracts entire worlds out of his instrument. His dexterity is matched only by his soulfulness. Backing him are bassist Vincent Romanelli and drummer Ray Marte who glide swiftly from tasty grooves and rhythmic illusions to full-on metal muscularity.

Loosely speaking, some modern-day reference points include The Mars Volta, Mastodon, and Between The Buried And Me. But Moon Tooth is its own, unique, "undeniably strange, totally kick-ass beast" as one MetalSucks editor put it.

Chromaparagon was recorded, mixed, and mastered by Moon Tooth drummer Ray Marte. The vivid cover art was created by Jon Contino. It is preceded by the band's 2013 debut EP, Freaks.
It's Always Sunny in Tijuana
It's Always Sunny in Tijuana
It's Always Sunny In Tijuana started in late 2010 in Denver Colorado. Their style started as a straight forward approach to Deathcore. Over the next few years their style has evolved to a diverse mix of Deathcore with a progressive feel. They have matched their writing with a stage presence that sets them apart. Tijuana has shared the stage with Six Feet Under, Revocation, Make Them Suffer, This or the Apocalypse, Those who Fear, Boris the Blade, Kingdom of Giants, Thira, Reaping Asmodeia, Dead for Denver, In Dying Arms, Eat A Helicopter, and Sky Burial. With an EP completed and and Full Length to be released in 2016, they are a heavy hitter that is not soon forgotten.
Venue Information:
Marquis Theater
2009 Larimer Street
Denver, CO, 80205
http://www.themarquistheatre.com/